Rose Theatre Kingston to Stage London Premiere of BERYL

Today Rose Theatre Kingston in association with West Yorkshire Playhouse announces the London première of BERYL, Maxine Peake’s critically-acclaimed play celebrating the life of sporting legend Beryl Burton – the greatest woman on two wheels. BERYL was nominated for best new play at the Manchester Theatre Awards today.

Rebecca Gatward directs the cast in a play about the loves, trials and tribulations of the down-to-earth Yorkshire cycling heroine with Samantha Power in the title role and Rebecca Ryan as her daughter Denise. The cast also features Dominic Gately and Lee Toomes.

Originally written for Radio 4 in 2012, BERYL opened at West Yorkshire Playhouse in summer 2014, just as the Tour de France was racing through Yorkshire. The critical and popular acclaim was such that the idea was born to revive and tour the production in 2015 before its London premiere here at the Rose in March 2016.

Peake’s stage writing debut looks back at the extraordinary sporting achievements of the Leeds-born cyclist. When Beryl Charnock, met keen cyclist Charlie Burton she was smitten, not only with Charlie but by the thrill and freedom found on her bike. She would outwork the men in the rhubarb fields, she could outclass the cyclists on the road, and still find time to over-knit young Denise an enviable cycling jumper.

No other British sportswoman has dominated their field in the way that Beryl Burton dominated the world of cycling. With her husband, daughter and cycling club at her side she became five times world pursuit champion, 13 times national champion, twice road-racing world champion and made it home in time for dinner. She was one of the most astonishing sports people ever to have lived whose down-to-earth, no-nonsense approach to life and to success is an inspiration to us all.

Beryl Burton MBE, OBE, wife and mother cycled her way into the record books becoming world record holder and former British record holder, and with a determination to be the best she always cycled home a hero.

Beryl’s daughter Denise Burton-Cole welcomes the revival of the play, “We are thrilled as it’s an outstanding play and it’s great that more people will see it”.

Maxine Peake has a career that spans stage, TV and film, garnering critical acclaim in roles as diverse as Dinnerladies’ Twinkle and Silk’s Martha Costello QC. She won the Broadcasting Press Guild Awards for her performances in Criminal Justice and The Street. Her other television credits include See No Evil: The Moors Murders, Red Riding, The Devil’s Whore, Criminal Justice, Little Dorrit, Henry IV, The Secret Diaries of Miss Anne Lister, BAFTA nominated dramas Silk, The Village, Room at the Top, Hancock & Joan, The Street and Shameless. She starred in features Private Peaceful, Run and Jump, Keeping Rosy, Svengali, The Theory of Everything and The Falling. Hamlet, filmed during the run at the Royal Exchange, was released in cinemas March 2015. She has performed at some of the most prestigious theatres in the country including The Cherry Orchard, The Relapse and Luther (The National Theatre), The Deep Blue Sea and Hamlet (West Yorkshire Playhouse), Mother Theresa is Dead (Royal Court), The Children’s Hour (Royal Exchange) and Miss Julie (Theatre Royal Haymarket/Royal Exchange). This is Peake’s stage writing debut.

Rebecca Gatward directs. Her theatre credits include The Merry Wives of Windsor (Grosvenor Park Open Air Theatre, Chester, summer 2015); Beryl (West Yorkshire Playhouse) The Trial Of Dennis The Menace (Southbank Centre); The Comedy Of Errors, The Merchant Of Venice (Shakespeare’s Globe); Pandas (Traverse Theatre); The Indian Boy (RSC Complete Works Festival); The Canterbury Tales directed in partnership with Greg Doran and Jonathan Munby and Thyestes for The Other Place (RSC); Touched (Salisbury Playhouse); Cancer Tales (New Wolsey); The Accrington Pals (WYP). She also restaged This Is Our Youth with Matt Damon and Casey Affleck at the Garrick Theatre.
Her work for television includes Eastenders (winner Broadcast award and soap award nominations for best episode and scene), Casualty, Doctors and Sadie J.

Samantha Power plays Beryl. Her theatre work includes Accrington Pals, Coming Around Again, Me, As a Penguin, It’s a Lovely Day Tomorrow (West Yorkshire Playhouse), Zack (Royal Exchange), Little Britain Live (UK and Australian Tour), Flint Street Nativity (Liverpool Playhouse); School Daze (Riverside Studios); It’s a Fine Bright Day Today (Oldham Coliseum); Raw,Kid (Theatre Absolute). Her television credits include Coronation Street, Ordinary Lies, 4 O’Clock club, All at Sea, Shameless, Little Britain, Waterloo Road, The Cup, In With the Flynns, Twisted Tales, The Mimic, Prisoners Wives. Her film credits include The Low Down and Mischief Night.

Rebecca Ryan plays Denise. Her theatre credits include Solace of the Road (Derby Theatre); A Taste of Honey (Hull Truck); Lost Monsters (Liverpool Everyman); Scarborough (Royal Court Theatre); Tommy (Manchester Palace). Her television credits include DCI Banks, Monroe, Waterloo Road, Emmerdale (ITV), Shameless and State of Play (BBC).

Dominic Gately plays Nim. Dominic trained at Guildford School of Acting. He appeared in the original cast of Beryl at West Yorkshire Playhouse in 2014 and in the 2015 revival. His other extensive theatre credits include: Absent Friends and The Sunshine Boys (Oldham Coliseum) Perfect Light, Time Moghul Gardens, Basil, Meggie and the Most Beautiful Man in the World, and Castaway Cafè (Slung Low Theatre), The Pillars of Society (Dale Theatre), An Absolute Turkey (Electric Theatre), Hamlet (Attic Theatre), Othello (Nottingham Playhouse), Romeo and Juliet (Shakespeare 4 Kids), The Crucible, Refugee Boy, Scuffer, Monkey! and Company Along the Mile (West Yorkshire Playhouse), The Good Person of Sichuan (Colchester Mercury), A View From the Bridge, The Deep Blue Sea, Loot and The Birthday Party (Keswick Theatre-by-the-Lake), The Weir (Stoke New Victoria), Kes (Liverpool Playhouse/Touring Consortium) and The Diary of Anna Frank (York Theatre Royal/Touring Consortium), The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (York Theatre Royal/Pilot Theatre). Dominic has also taken part in many rehearsed readings and workshopped new writing for many theatres around the country. In Film and Television he has appeared in Coronation Street (Granada) Virus 2050 (LSB Productions), Waterloo Road (Shed Productions), Emmerdale and The Royal (ITV Yorkshire), Paradox (Clerkenwell Films for BBC) Walk Like a Panther (Finite Films)

Lee Toomes plays Charlie. Lee trained at The Arden School of Theatre. Theatre credits include: One-Man Show Before The Leaves Fall (Space2); A Christmas Carol, When I’m cleaning Windows (Northeast Productions Tour); The House Behind The Lines (Buglight Theatre); Santa’s Grotty (Lyric Theatre, Hammersmith); The Fanny Hill Project (Theatre State); All through A Glass Of Port, No Exit (Hands On Theatre Company); Engagement With Murder, Up ‘N’ Under (Lamproom Theatre); Blood Brothers (WLT); Comedy Of Errors (On Your Toes); Not Hard To Die, Charade, Behind Closed Doors, Ruby Quicksilver (Jaba); Illyria, Romeo And Juliet, A Chorus Of Disapproval, The Good Person Of Szechwan whilst training. Television and film credits include: The Driver (Red Productions); In The Flesh (BBC3); The Syndicate (Rollem Productions); Shameless (Channel 4), The Body Farm (BBC); Jobseekers (YPS Media); The Downward Spiral Of Kevin Lames, Finding Vivian (National Media Museum); Snowball (TM Productions).

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Maxine Peake’s new play to get London premiere

Maxine Peake’s play Beryl about the cyclist Beryl Burton will run at the Rose Theatre Kingston from March.

Burton was a Yorkshire cycling heroine, who dominated the world of cycling from the late 50s and 60s. She won the women’s world road race championship in 1960 and 1967 and was world champion five times.

Peake originally wrote the play for radio in 2012 and it opened at West Yorkshire Playhouse in 2014 as the Tour de France raced through Yorkshire. The play was Peake’s stage writing debut and the production will be directed by Rebecca Gatward with Samantha Power in the title role and Rebecca Ryan as her daughter Denise.

The daughter of Burton, Denise Burton-Cole said: “We are thrilled as it’s an outstanding play and it’s great that more people will see it”.

The play just received a nomination for best new play at the Manchester Theatre Awards.

Beryl will open on 9 March and run until the 19 March.

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Maxine Peake up for Manchester Theatre Awards

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Maxine Peake has been nominated for both her acting and writing in this year’s Manchester Theatre Awards.

The star is up for best actress for her role as a demonic fairy in The Skriker at the Royal Exchange theatre.

It is the second year in a row she has been up for best actress, after being nominated for playing Hamlet last year.

This year, she is also nominated for best new play for writing Beryl, about cycling champion Beryl Burton, which was staged at The Lowry in Salford.

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Peake, known for TV dramas like Shameless, Silk and The Village, wrote Beryl but did not appear in it.

The play, which started life as a BBC Radio 4 drama, told the story of the woman who won seven world titles and held the UK women’s all-round title for 25 consecutive years.

The Manchester Evening News’ City Life supplement, meanwhile, has named The Skriker the best play of 2015 in its own annual awards.

In her review, the paper’s Dianne Bourne described Peake as overseeing “her debauched band of zombie fiends like a cross between Vivienne Westwood and the Virgin Queen”.

The production of Caryl Churchill’s play was part of last summer’s Manchester International Festival.

The Manchester Theatre Awards winners will be announced on 4 March.

Bolton’s Octagon theatre leads the main acting and production categories, followed closely by the Royal Exchange and Oldham Coliseum. The Lowry dominates the shortlists for visiting productions.

Manchester Theatre Awards – key categories:

Best actress

Scarlett Brookes in Educating Rita at Oldham Coliseum
Barbara Drennan in A View From The Bridge and The Family Way at Octagon Theatre, Bolton
Kathryn Hunter in Kafka’s Monkey at Home
Maxine Peake in The Skriker at the Royal Exchange

Best actor

Colin Connor in A View From The Bridge at Octagon Theatre, Bolton
Rob Edwards in An Enemy Of The People at Octagon Theatre, Bolton
Jonjo O’Neill in The Crucible at the Royal Exchange
Sam Swann in Pomona at the Royal Exchange

Best production

Educating Rita at Oldham Coliseum
An Enemy of the People at Octagon Theatre, Bolton
Rites at Contact
A View From The Bridge at Octagon Theatre, Bolton

See the full list of nominees on the Manchester Theatre Awards website.

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Gallery Update: Snapshots of Comic Strip Presents…Red Top.

Imagine Rebekah Brooks roller-skating through the Sun newsroom…

Imagine Rebekah Brooks roller-skating through the Sun newsroom…

Imagine Rebekah Brooks roller-skating through the Sun’s newsroom as editorial staff, having been told to avoid making eye contact, duck below their desks.

And conjure up this image: a wheelchair-bound Rupert Murdoch locked in a room by Wendi Deng as she spends time with guitar-strumming Tony Blair.

Closer to the home of this blog, envision the former Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger leading a news conference sing-song of the newspaper’s anthem with a refrain about swinging to the left.

These are just three of the memorable scenes from a wonderful TV satire, Red Top, to be screened later this month.

It’s a glorious, irreverent post-hacking lampoon, a fantasy set in the 1970s with flairs, moustaches and disco music, that tells the story of Rebekah, an ingenue from the north of England who, having accidentally become chief executive of News International, gets embroiled (innocently of course) in a scandal.

At two previews, I witnessed audiences laughing aloud, and often, at the unfolding of the surreal plot and the hysterical portrayals of the main characters.

Conceived and written by Peter Richardson – with co-writers Pete Richens and Brigit Grant – it is his latest Comic Strip presentation.

Maxine Peake stars as the beguiling Brooks, the eponymous red-top, and there are a clutch of brilliant cameo performances. They include Harry Enfield as Ross Kemp, Brooks’s ex-husband; Stephen Mangan as Blair; Russell Tovey as Andy Coulson; Nigel Planer as Murdoch; and Eleanor Matsuura as Wendi.

Look out also for Johnny Vegas, Alexei Sayle, Dominic Tighe (as a subservient David Cameron) and a double role by John Sessions.

Richardson describes Red Top as a “Boogie Nights-style parallel universe with a disco soundtrack.” And I agree with Gold’s commissioning editor, Simon Lupton, who said: “The script is wonderfully hilarious and playful.”

Red Top is due to be shown on UKTV’s channel, Gold, at 10pm on 20 January. It is not to be missed.

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The Comic Strip’s ‘Redtop’ gives a satirical kicking to Brooks, Blair and Murdoch

The Comic Strip’s ‘Redtop’ gives a satirical kicking to Brooks, Blair and Murdoch

Nigel Planer is showing me a video selfie he made in his Plymouth hotel bedroom – facial close-ups of Planer practising playing Rupert Murdoch for a new Comic Strip spoof, Redtop, about the phone-hacking scandal. It’s hard to tell from these exercises how effective will be the former Young Ones star’s imitation of the media tycoon – but if it’s as half as clever as his Peter Mandelson in the 2011 pastiche The Hunt for Tony Blair, then we are in for a treat.
“Because I’m not an impressionist, I try to latch on to an internal feeling”, says Planer of the way in which he nailed Mandelson’s slippery inscrutability, admitting that he was assisted by a grudging sympathy for his subjects. “Everyone thinks they know Murdoch, but if you watch as many hours of him in interviews as I have, you come to quite like him. He’s not a Spitting Image puppet – that kind of satire is very shallow, cheap and easy.”

Where The Hunt for Tony Blair imagined the New Labour Prime Minister as a fugitive in a 1950s film noir (guilty of the murders of, among others, John Smith and Robin Cook…), Redtop transposes recent events to the disco-era 1970s. Stephen Mangan reprises the role of a perma-grinning Blair, with Maxine Peake as Rebekah Brooks and Russell Tovey as Andy Coulson. The starting point for the Seventies backdrop, says writer and Comic Strip major-domo Peter Richardson, was Washington Post journalist Carl Bernstein comparing the phone-hacking scandal to Watergate.

“We even have our own ‘deep throat’-style whistleblower – a Sun reporter played by Johnny Vegas”, says Richardson, who based the character on Sean Hoare, the late News of the World showbiz reporter who originally broke the scandal when he spoke to The New York Times. “Also in the Seventies Tony Blair was in his rock band Ugly Rumours. In our film he’s started a new band with a funkier message, called Positive Thinking…”

“There’s something incredibly enjoyable about Stephen Mangan as Tony Blair in a massive moustache and sideboards in a ludicrous Afghan jacket and green shirt and platform boots”, says Planer. “And to have Rebekah Brooks on roller skates throughout the film… a good analogy for her water-off-a-duck’s back life, that she just skates through everything.”

“I’ve got this fabulous long red wig,” adds Peake when I catch up with her later. “It starts off with her leaving school in the north and hitchhiking her way to London and entering into Rupert Murdoch’s offices. I spoke to people who met her and everybody said, ‘Very charming… she always got what she wanted from people.’ ”

Peake, who was born in Bolton, says the only part of her research into the Warrington-raised Brooks that truly surprised her was a shared taste in music. “She was really into the band the Cramps, which I liked, and I didn’t think me and Rebekah would have anything in common,” she says. “She’s lost her accent in this, like she has in real life. It’s Cheshire anyway, and they’re a bit posh there.

“It’s very tongue in cheek; everyone gets it in the neck in a lighthearted way,” adds Peake of this, the 42nd entry in a Comic Strip Presents… canon that began on the very first night of Channel 4 in 1982 with the Enid Blyton satire Five Go Mad in Dorset. But can you be lighthearted about a scandal that included the phone-hacking of the parents of the murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler? “That’s where we tread very carefully,” says Peake.“Nobody who was a victim of that is referenced in this piece.”

Instead, there is much fun made of Brooks’ various relationships – with Andy Coulson and her former husband Ross Kemp (played by Harry Enfield). A different problem for such a topical satire might be that none of it is, well, all that topical. Planer himself is sorry that Murdoch’s alleged romance with Jerry Hall hadn’t made the gossip columns when the film was being written.

“We need a sequel,” he says, before going on to explain the time lag. “We’re very quick turning them round; it’s the broadcasters who aren’t. They can sit on it for years sometimes. The initial ideas for this one are over three years old. It’s immensely frustrating.”

Richardson doesn’t agree – believing that the time lag allows space for a fuller picture to emerge, as well giving the lawyers a chance to pore over the script. “I think everyone’s still scared of News International [now known as News UK] or the people involved, which I think is quite chilling”, he says, adding that without the distance between idea and execution they wouldn’t have known about Blair’s alleged affair with Murdoch’s ex-wife Wendi Deng (played here by Eleanor Matsuura).

“We made good use of a Vanity Fair article which was about 30 pages of comings and goings, including with Murdoch ending up in casualty with her beating him up.”

Meanwhile the real Rebekah Brooks was acquitted in 2014 of involvement in phone hacking at News International, the Old Bailey jury accepting that as the newspaper’s head she was more or less incompetent. It’s the line that Richardson takes with his fictionalised Rebekah. “She’s a poor, innocent northern girl who comes down and accidentally becomes chief executive of News International,” he says, “with people around her doing horrible things she doesn’t know about.”

Richardson originally co-created the Comic Strip to showcase his double act with Planer, which began in the late 1970s. “Peter’s a pretty single-minded individual,” says Planer when I ask him to dissect their partnership. “He doesn’t – unlike the rest of us – take jobs somewhere else. And I’m the opposite: I can duck and dive… I’ve worked in all sorts of styles.”

Indeed, Planer’s career has been extraordinarily diverse, taking in West End musicals, a Spinal Tap-style spoof rock band (Bad News, the subject of a Comic Strip spin-off) as well as films and TV dramas and comedies (most recently as Matt Le Blanc’s lawyer in Episodes). He has also written books, plays and a slim volume of poetry. But he remains famous for two roles – Neil the lugubrious hippy in the seminal 1980s sitcom The Young Ones, and a precious actor, Nicholas Craig, in a series of spoof masterclasses. “Neil and Nicholas Craig come from my own self,” he says. “They’re not like acting jobs. For years I used to be like Neil; then after Neil I wasn’t.”

Planer and Richardson both cite The Strike, the 1988 spoof on the miners’ strike, imaging Al Pacino in the role of Arthur Scargill, as one of their favourite Comic Strip films; while Planer says he’d like to make a sequel to a couple of more recent offerings, Four Men in a Car (1998) and Four Men in a Plane (2000), road movie comedies which starred Richardson, Planer and Planer’s former Young Ones co-stars Adrian Edmondson and Rik Mayall. It would, he says, be a tribute to Mayall, who died suddenly in 2014.

“It would be an Ortonesque piece where the coffin goes missing,” says Planer. “We could call it Three Men and a Funeral, which I think would be funny – and I think Rik would have liked it. But you can always say that when someone’s died…”

‘Redtop’ is on Gold on 20 January

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The Comic Strip takes on Rebekah Brooks in first look at new special Red Top

Can Maxine Peake, Russell Tovey and Stephen Mangan hack it?

The Comic Strip’s upcoming satire Red Top has released a new image of its all-star cast.

The special, which will focus on Rebekah Brooks (Maxine Peake) and the phone hacking scandal, will air on Gold on January 20.


L to R – Bob Harris (Peter Richardson), Wendi (Eleanor Matsuura), Coulson (Russell Tovey), Rebekah (Maxine Peake), Blair (Stephen Mangan), Johnny (Johnny Vegas), Ross (Harry Enfield)

Alongside Peake, the show will star Nigel Planer as Rupert Murdoch, Russell Tovey as Andy Coulson and Harry Enfield as Ross Kemp.

Red Top will also star Stephen Mangan, Johnny Vegas and Peter Richardson.

It is described as the story of Rebekah, “an innocent and beguiling Northern girl​” who becomes Chief Executive of News International​ through a series of accidental circumstances and gets tied-up in a “’70s Watergate-style scandal​”.

The Comic Strip previously parodied Tony Blair in The Hunt For Tony Blair.

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Actors Shaun Evans and Maxine Peake perform Liverpool’s Penny Readings to sold-out audience

The traditional event was held at St. George’s Hall on Sunday

City of Readers members with Maxine Peake and Shaun Evans and Whitefield Primary staff

Actors Shaun Evans and Maxine Peake performed the annual Penny Readings to a sold-out audience today.

The traditional event, which dates back to the Victorian times when Charles Dickens once performed the readings, was held in St George’s Hall .

Special readings, music and entertainment were put on at the event, all for the price of a penny.

City of Readers members with Maxine Peake and Whitefield Primary staff

City of Readers members with Maxine Peake and Whitefield Primary staff

Liverpool-born actor Shaun Evans , from ITV drama Endeavour, performed the penny readings with actress Maxine Peake, known for her roles in The Theory of Everything, Shameless and Dinnerladies.

The penny readings take place every year and have become a much loved feature of Liverpool’s festival calendar.

Previous readers include ECHO editor Alastair Machray, TV presenter Loyd Grossman and Roger Phillips, BBC Radio Merseyside broadcaster.

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VOTE: Best Play finalists in the CityLife Awards 2015

This year, you get to choose who takes this coveted title in our annual awards, which recognise the people and places who made the most of the last 12 months

We reckon 2015 has been a monumental year for theatre in Manchester.

Not only have our theatres created several critically acclaimed productions, but we’ve seen entirely new production houses opening – specifically HOME – and others push themselves in bold new ways under new artistic directors. Not to mention the return of the biennial Manchester International Festival.

The Best Play category was one we had quite a lot of nominations for and that caused some serious debate in CityLife Towers, too.

But in the end, we’ve picked a selection that we think show the full breadth of what Manchester theatres experienced in the past 12 months: Manchester writers, original work, bold roles taken on by local big name actors, plus the absolute best of the visiting productions.

After much debate, then, this is our final shortlist of five:
Pomona, Royal Exchange
The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night Time, The Lowry
A View From The Bridge, Bolton Octagon
The Skriker, Manchester International Festival/Royal Exchange
Golem, HOME

All that’s left to do is choose, and you can do that by picking your favourite on the form below.

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Giving Tuesday – Royal Exchange launches scheme to get more people attending theatre

Today is Giving Tuesday and the Royal Exchange Theatre has the perfect gift for theatre lovers.

To coincide with the global day of giving, the city centre theatre has launched a scheme called Arts Pot.

The initiative is a bursary which helps towards the cost of tickets, travel expenses, workshop and project fees for people who may not otherwise be able to attend plays and shows.

Last year, the scheme raised more than £10,000 thanks to the generosity of the venue’s audiences during interval and end-of-show ‘bucket shaking’.

Above is a short film narrated by theatre ambassador Maxine Peake, who has starred in many production and the famous theatre in the round, including Hamlet and The Skriker as part of MIF 2015, showing exactly where that cash went.

Maxine Peake as a demon faerie in The Skriker.

ARTS POT 2014 paid for:

296 People to take part in over 1000 workshops, community projects and productions

1183 people to receive free and subsidised tickets to more than 20 shows at the Royal Exchange Theatre

125 people to travel to and from the theatre throughout the year

The Royal Exchange is working with other local charities, organisations and Giving Tuesday in a steering group for ‘Manchester Gives More’ – a city initiative to make Manchester the most philanthropic city in the country.

Donations to Arts Pot can be made online or by texting EXCH16 £5 to 70070.

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